Genevieve Nnaji's 'Lionheart' - A Review by Bola Aduwo

mamazita!

Active Member
#1
Tis the season to be merry and celebrate so in line with that I decided on Christmas Day to go see both of the biggest films this season and that in my estimation is ‘Lion Heart’ & Chief Daddy’. This review is for the much talked about ‘Lion Heart’ which was produced, directed and acted by Genevieve Nnaji.
Now there was already a buzz going on about ‘Lion Heart’ being that it was produced, directed and acted by Genevieve, (The Genevieve!) then it was snapped up by Netflix before it was even premiered at TIFF (not a common occurrence especially for an African film) then ofcourse the brouhaha that was raised due to it almost being boycotted by Independent marketers (See the reasons here in an article I wrote Cobrareview here So a lot was riding on this movie. I had to see whether it was worth the drama. My review goes thus: First of all the crowd to see this film on Christmas Day at Silver Bird Cinemas Ikeja was crazy! The line stretched for almost out of the theatre. After all the hustling and jostling, I was able to make my way into the darkened hall, and settle down to watch the film. Let me give a brief run through without any spoilers.
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Lion Heart is the story of Adaeze, (played by Nnaji) a hard working, competent executive in her father’s Transport business who is unexpectedly handed the reins and the responsibility of steering the company back on it feet when her father (well played by the legendary Pete Edochie) suffers a heart attack. The film cleverly takes an almost humourous but still seering look at how sexism and patriarchy tend to affect the Nigerian woman in the work place. Not fully believing she has what it takes to handle the giant transport business, the father elicits the ‘help’ of his younger brother Godswill (the perenially funny Nkem Owoh) to ‘assist’ her, not trusting that she is perfectly capable of handling it herself. Nkem does not disappoint, but adds his dry humour, proverbs and sarcasm to the equation, with many of his quibs, I’m sure were adlibbed
For the rest of the review click here Lion Heart Review Contd/
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#2
This one is also doing good business for a movie barely promoted. And it is being praised by those who should know, which is a great thing. Deliberately 'Igbotic', they say, but maturely done in that context. Opens on Netflix on the 4th of January, 2019. Look forward to it. Genny is one of a kind for some of us...
 

mamazita!

Active Member
#3
This one is also doing good business for a movie barely promoted. And it is being praised by those who should know, which is a great thing. Deliberately 'Igbotic', they say, but maturely done in that context. Opens on Netflix on the 4th of January, 2019. Look forward to it. Genny is one of a kind for some of us...
Yes it was deliberately Igbotic! Igbo was spoken and the culture was celebrated unapologetically. Lol And I understand... the biggest films in the last few years 'Wedding Party, Chief Daddy have been a celebration of most things Yoruba. I still enjoyed it though. It gives you a bird's eye view of the the dynamics of an Igbo Middle class family.
 
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